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liliesandcoffeegrinds:

Angela Brigid Lansbury - October 16, 1925

Providing I can put one foot in front of the other, I will continue to act.

Happy 89th Birthday Dame Angela!!

— Shared October 17 with 49 notes via slightly-silly (Source) —


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playbill:

Happy Birthday Angela Lansbury!

Five-time Tony Award winner Angela Lansbury was born on October 16. Find out more about the star of the original Broadway productions of Sweeney Todd, Mame, Anyone Can Whistle and Dear World at PlaybillVault.com.



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the sky is not the limit, the window is

the sky is not the limit, the window is

— Shared October 16


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bustedbussy:

our first lady everyone 



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omgthatdress:

Evening Dress
Yves Saint Laurent for Dior, 1960
The Victoria & Albert Museum

omgthatdress:

Evening Dress

Yves Saint Laurent for Dior, 1960

The Victoria & Albert Museum



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Anonymous
omg if baby oil dissolves condoms what the fuck does it do to babies???

joleebindo:

the-kellin-under-the-vic:

This may be shocking, but babies and condoms are made of different material

it’s like rock paper scissors: baby oil defeats condom, baby defeats baby oil, condom defeats baby





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koolaidicecubes:


she don’t even care bout that war no more… she ready

koolaidicecubes:

image

she don’t even care bout that war no more… she ready





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coelasquid:

An interesting problem to face as a writer, if you create a character with the explicit purpose of making them represent a vile, unlikeable person with horrible opinions, what responsibility do you have if that character becomes a runaway favourite with exactly the type of person you’re attempting to lampoon? Suddenly your audience is full of these terrible people with terrible opinions, idolizing your terrible character, treating them like a role model, parroting their ignorant speech in everyday conversation, emulating their actions, perpetuating their harmful behaviour in real life, and generally replacing the audience you intended to cultivate with the audience you intended to lampoon. How do you take the reigns back? What responsibility do you have to amend your approach and show that this character is not to be idolized. It’s easy enough to say “the opinions of the writer are not the opinions of the character” and dust off your hands, but what responsibility does the writer have to dissuade fans who DO support the opinions of the character and champion them as validation for their own behaviour?

It’s easy enough to call this a trap of lazy writers, but even highly critically acclaimed work falls victim to it. In an interview I’m having trouble tracking down again, Alan Moore has described running into this sort of problem with Rorschach in Watchmen being celebrated for all the qualities he was attempting to use him to criticize. The folks behind Breaking Bad essentially had to flat out tell audiences “No. Walt is a bad guy” in venues outside of the show to try to stem the tide of people idolizing him. The rebellious, fuck-the-rules renegade going his own way is very appealing to people who feel as though their behaviour has been muzzled by virtue of having to share society with other people who aren’t exactly like them and let them do whatever they want, so naturally they take these characters as heroes and put them on a pedestal.

The cultivation of the fanbase you want to have is something I think about a lot, because if you don’t actively consider this sort of thing you can end up amassing an audience responsible for some pretty reprehensible behaviour and being saddled with their reputation when you face the general public. At the same time there’s such a fine line to walk between making intentionally unlikeable characters CLEARLY a criticism of the sort of behaviour you’re trying to portray in a negative light and making them one dimensional strawmen. I dunno, it’s tough, it’s a line between creativity, storytelling, and social responsibility.



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